Enthusiastic Islanders

Raymond Island is well known as a relaxing holiday destination with the promise of easy koala spotting and a leisurely lifestyle. Working to improve the bush outlook that visitors travel hundreds of kilometres to enjoy, is a year-round job for the Raymond Island Landcare Group.

For over a decade the group has been systematically improving the health of the island, home to an abundance of wildlife and migratory birds, one plot at a time.

Pam Williams-Wright, the president of the group notes how popular the island has become, “Melbourne is just so busy now that people are looking for somewhere else to retire to and we’re finding that people are moving up having visited the region only a handful of times.”  It’s this regeneration of people and enthusiasm and seeing the transformation in real time that keeps the group inspired to continue making a change.

With funding from Victorian Landcare Grants, the group have been working on eight separate sites for over 20 years.

Rob Wright has helped to regenerate 30 acres of bushland since he first moved to the island five years ago. “It’s not complicated” he says, “It’s going to take many years to see the benefits of our hard work but it’s not hard to see what’s already popping up. We’ve got to give back and get it back to something like what it was.“

“Our works have made a huge difference already, especially in the community. People are getting enthusiastic about it, they can see the effects of what we’re doing and that makes a huge difference.”

The Victorian Landcare Grants have recently opened for 2019-20 with grants of up to $20,000 available. If you are a member of a Landcare group or an environmental community group with a great idea for a project on your patch then you should consider applying.

Applications close on 12th June.

Wetland Wonders

Wetlands are more than just swamps, they serve an important ecological function and are important places for Traditional Owners.

That was the takeaway at the recent Wonders of the Wetlands tour, led by the EGCMA in conjunction with Greening Australia and the Lower Tambo Landcare Group.

Attendees had the opportunity to travel to sites along the lower Tambo to see the progress of works being undertaken by Greening Australia. They learned about the environmental and cultural importance of the Twin Rivers, while Birdlife Australia’s Deb Sullivan discussed the migratory birds who visit the Gippsland Lakes each year.

The EGCMA would like to thank the community members, landholders and partner organisations who helped make this day such a success.

Project sites visited have been funded by the Victorian State Government as part of $222 million committed to improving the health of waterways and catchments in Victoria.

Snowy Know How

The lower Snowy River work is continuing this year with an ongoing partnership between the East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority (EGCMA) and Moogji Aboriginal Council.

The Moogji works crew have been working on the river for over a decade and look after the area from Jarrahmond to the Brodribb. The crew controls weeds and plants native seedlings to improve the health of the Snowy.

“Moogji are a terrific partner providing opportunities for local people to develop a career path and further employment opportunities while improving the health of the river.” said EGCMA CEO, Graeme Dear.

This aligns with the objectives of the Water Plan for Victoria which seeks greater involvement of indigenous people in waterway management.

All aboard in the east

With Mallacoota abuzz throughout the Wild Harvest Seafood Festival over the weekend, some lucky participants were able to enjoy the celebrations, and the idyllic location, from the water.

Over 50 festival go-ers joined the East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority and Parks Victora aboard the M.V. Loch-Ard for a tour of the bottom lake.

Taking in Swimming Point, the Narrows and a surprise visit from a couple of playful dolphins, guests learnt about the estuary’s ecology and cultural significance while soaking in its stunning beauty and wildlife.

Snowy know how

The lower Snowy River work is continuing this year with an ongoing partnership between the East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority (EGCMA) and Moogji Aboriginal Council.

The Moogji works crew have been working on the river for over a decade and look after the area from Jarrahmond to the Brodribb. The crew controls weeds and plants native seedlings to improve the health of the Snowy.

“Moogji are a terrific partner providing opportunities for local people to develop a career path and further employment opportunities while improving the health of the river.” said EGCMA CEO, Graeme Dear.

This aligns with the objectives of the Water Plan for Victoria which seeks greater involvement of indigenous people in waterway management.