Snowy Shelter

The East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority has been working with local contractors to install twenty-five large wooden structures as habitat for fish and the small critters they feed on.

Funded through the State Governments recreational fishing licences fund, the structures are created from tethering logs with rootballs to a pile driven into the bed of the river from a barge. This minimises disturbance and damage to the adjoining riverbanks.

The structures create shelter and resting spots for key recreational angling species such as Australian Bass, Bream, Luderick and Estuary Perch, and provide refuge from predators.

“Large numbers of snags provide shelter and habitat for fish and the food they prey on”, said Graeme Dear, CEO of the EGCMA. “This project not only benefits the health of the Snowy estuary, but also recreational fishing and tourism for the region.”

Graeme said “ Marlo Angling Club has been actively involved over the years to help prioritise works and promote the benefits of a healthy river to fisherman and the broader community. We would like to thank them for their continued support.”

The EGCMA are working in partnership with DELWP and VicRoads to utilise suitable logs removed for roadworks to help improve our waterways.

Wetland Wonders

Wetlands are more than just swamps, they serve an important ecological function and are important places for Traditional Owners.

That was the takeaway at the recent Wonders of the Wetlands tour, led by the EGCMA in conjunction with Greening Australia and the Lower Tambo Landcare Group.

Attendees had the opportunity to travel to sites along the lower Tambo to see the progress of works being undertaken by Greening Australia. They learned about the environmental and cultural importance of the Twin Rivers, while Birdlife Australia’s Deb Sullivan discussed the migratory birds who visit the Gippsland Lakes each year.

The EGCMA would like to thank the community members, landholders and partner organisations who helped make this day such a success.

Project sites visited have been funded by the Victorian State Government as part of $222 million committed to improving the health of waterways and catchments in Victoria.

Snowy Know How

The lower Snowy River work is continuing this year with an ongoing partnership between the East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority (EGCMA) and Moogji Aboriginal Council.

The Moogji works crew have been working on the river for over a decade and look after the area from Jarrahmond to the Brodribb. The crew controls weeds and plants native seedlings to improve the health of the Snowy.

“Moogji are a terrific partner providing opportunities for local people to develop a career path and further employment opportunities while improving the health of the river.” said EGCMA CEO, Graeme Dear.

This aligns with the objectives of the Water Plan for Victoria which seeks greater involvement of indigenous people in waterway management.

Snowy know how

The lower Snowy River work is continuing this year with an ongoing partnership between the East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority (EGCMA) and Moogji Aboriginal Council.

The Moogji works crew have been working on the river for over a decade and look after the area from Jarrahmond to the Brodribb. The crew controls weeds and plants native seedlings to improve the health of the Snowy.

“Moogji are a terrific partner providing opportunities for local people to develop a career path and further employment opportunities while improving the health of the river.” said EGCMA CEO, Graeme Dear.

This aligns with the objectives of the Water Plan for Victoria which seeks greater involvement of indigenous people in waterway management.

Mallacoota Estuary Open

The East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority (EGCMA) advises that the entrance at Mallacoota Inlet estuary was opened on 21st March.

Good rainfall over the catchment at the beginning of last week meant that conditions were favourable for Parks Victoria to artificially open the entrance with lake levels now beginning to drop.

EGCMA CEO Graeme Dear said  “We will continue to monitor water levels and stream flows into the estuary and provide further advice if the entrance closes again”.

“We would also like to thank those in the community who have assisted with data gathering in recent months” Mr Dear said.